‘In the Spotlight’ # 3: Adam

Share on Facebook33Share on Google+0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn0Pin on Pinterest0

 

 

[Greek Text to Follow]

 

The eldest of three brothers, Adam arrived to Cyprus after fleeing the war in Syria, leaving his mother and father behind in Damascus. As a 25-year-old architecture graduate, Adam shares his thoughts about his war torn country and people, his hopes for the future and what he has learned having been dealt a fate that placed him in the middle of a war zone.

 

Text and photograph by Melissa Hekkers

Throughout my conversation with Adam there is a prevalent back and forth between the past and the future; a timeline that Adam grounds in the present with his determination to move forward through the waiting period of his asylum application into the prospect of a brighter future. Wearing a blatant smile, and an avid thirst for knowledge, we spend about an hour outside the Caritas Migrant Centre in the heart of Nicosia; a place he spends a good amount of time contemplating his next steps.

Originally from the city centre of Damascus, where Adam’s family still resides, Adam left his hometown to avoid being recruited for military purposes and fight on the front line of the war in Syria.

“My father didn’t want to think about the possibility of me fighting in the war, my family was worried about me… they bought me a ticket to leave Damascus,” recalls Adam, who has been in Nicosia for the past four months.

Born into a family of architects and engineers, Adam’s family prospered in developing villages around Damascus prior to 2012. “The war began in the villages we were working in,” reveals Adam, “our business was blown up, all the buildings we constructed in villages blew up, everything just blew up,” he adds.

As a result, Adam’s father hasn’t worked for the past six years, “he’s just waiting for the war to finish,” Adam tells me, while his mother commutes between Beirut and Damascus for medical reasons but also to get away from the atmosphere the war has imposed on her daily life.

“When I talk to my mother and I ask her about how may father is doing, she tells me that he is drawing plans and urban designs for Damascus after the war, he sits in his office and he works out everything; where the hospital is going to be; in which plot, what buildings there will be for homeless people to live in… it’s not good for a man to have nothing to do,” says Adam.

“For sure, if the war finishes, I’m going back to Syria, wherever I am in the world, I’m going back, I wish to rebuild Damascus,” he adds.

With a younger brother living in Beirut and another in Germany, Adam has been seeking subsidiary protection in Cyprus for the past four months and is anticipating a decision from asylum services in the near future.

“I’m pretty new here, I need to see if I have a chance to continue my life here, but now I’m just waiting, waiting, waiting. I’m really nervous, I’m 25 years old and I’m trying. I’m not the kind of person that gives up, but it’s really hard,” he admits.

“War has taught me how to love my people, how to understand them. Before, when I saw Syrian people in Damascus I didn’t used to say hi to them, I didn’t take care of them. But now when I see them here I talk to them, I try to take the problems they have on my shoulders and for them to take the problems I have on theirs. That’s what I learned. I learned to think about others.”

One of the reasons Adam chose to come to Cyprus is because he feels he’s closer to his parents here.

“No one ever imagined we would be here [displaced], all Syrian people have difficulty accepting this although some accept the idea of traveling away, but before no one ever imagined they would travel outside of Syria. We love our country, we want to stay in it,” he states.

“Damascus is beautiful, but everyone has run away, every young person has gone, Damascus is now full of ladies and old people, all young people are troubled. This war has cost us 30 years, a generation… if the war finished now we would need the next 30 years to rebuild not just Damascus but the people of Damascus and that’s actually something tough to think about, if we find a solution we will face other problems,” he muses.

During our conversation Adam pulls out his cell phone from which he shares photos of his life back in Syria, his beautiful mum, his brothers, his house, his dog he left behind. He shows me a photo of the summer home his family had on the outskirts of Damascus.

“There are people living in our summer house, they broke the door and they have been living in it but they’re our people, we can’t tell them to leave, they need shelter in this war,” he tells me as he continues to roam through the photo gallery on his phone.

Yet, from his perspective living outside of his war torn country, Adam can already reflect on what the war has taught him.

“War has taught me how to love my people, how to understand them. Before, when I saw Syrian people in Damascus I didn’t used to say hi to them, I didn’t take care of them. But now when I see them here I talk to them, I try to take the problems they have on my shoulders and for them to take the problems I have on theirs. That’s what I learned. I learned to think about others.”

As our conversation comes to a close, Adam helps me understand that the reason he is here is ultimately to find hope and attain protection. Yet part of him worries about his future, even if his granted protection.

“I studied architecture for six years and that’s what I’m good at, I’m good in architecture, I’m good at planning, I’m good at making designs, it would be tough for me to keep a job cleaning cars,” he says.

As Adam awaits an answer for his application, and having studied architecture, he hopes that one-day he will be able to practice the profession he persevered in studying. As an asylum-seeker, Adam is legally unable to work for his first six months after submitting an application. After six months he can work in very few areas such as petrol stations, sanitation, and agriculture regardless of his qualifications. Given these limitations, Adam tries to make the most of out of his time.

“I don’t like having huge amounts of time without anything to do, this is a big problem. I’m learning French so that I can understand the Africans that I’m living with. I’m learning a new architectural programme, but it’s not enough, I have already waited four months…. we need to be patient and we will see, I don’t know what God has in mind for us,” says Adam with his generous smile that pin-points the unexpected.

 

 

***Caritas Cyprus assisted Adam in securing accommodation and applying for asylum upon arriving to the island. Caritas currently supports Adam with legal advice and social support as he awaits for the decision of asylum services.

*** The names of persons interviewed in these short stories have been changed in order to protect the privacy of the individuals.

***For more information, ways to get involved, or inquiries, please call us at 22662606 or email us at administration@caritascyprus.org


‘In the Spotlight’ #3: Αδάμ

 

Ο μεγαλύτερος από τρία αδέλφια, ο Αδάμ, έφτασε στην Κύπρο, αποδρώντας από τον πόλεμο στη Συρία και αφήνοντας τους γονείς του πίσω στη Δαμασκό. Εικοσιπέντε χρονών, πτυχιούχος αρχιτεκτονικής, ο Αδάμ μοιράζεται τις σκέψεις του για τη χώρα του, το λαό του, τις ελπίδες του για το μέλλον και ό,τι έμαθε, έχοντας να αντιμετωπίσει τη μοίρα που τον έβαλε στη μέση μιας εμπόλεμης ζώνης.

 

Kείμενο και φωτογραφίες απο τη Melissa Hekkers

Καθ’ όλη τη συνομιλία μας, υπάρχει μια συνεχής ροή μπροστά και πίσω στο χρόνο, ανάμεσα στο παρελθόν και το μέλλον -ένα χρονοδιάγραμμα που ο Αδάμ γειώνει στο παρόν- με μια αποφασιστικότητα να προχωρήσει μπροστά, εν αναμονή της αίτησής του για πολιτικό άσυλο και στην προοπτική για ένα καλύτερο μέλλον. Χαμογελάει έντονα και παθιάζεται για γνώση. Περνάμε περίπου μια ώρα έξω από το κέντρο μεταναστών Caritas στην καρδιά της Λευκωσίας, ένα μέρος όπου ξοδεύει πολύ χρόνο, περιμένωντας τα επόμενα βήματα του.

Κατάγεται από το κέντρο της Δαμασκού, εκεί όπου εξακολουθεί να μένει η οικογένειά του. Ο Αδάμ εγκατέλειψε την πατρίδα για να αποφύγει τη στρατολόγηση και να πολεμήσει στην πρώτη γραμμή του πολέμου στη Συρία.

«Ο πατέρας μου δεν ήθελε ούτε καν να σκεφτεί για την πιθανότητα να πολεμήσω στον πόλεμο. Η οικογένειά μου ανησυχούσε για μένα… Μου αγόρασαν ένα εισιτήριο για να φύγω από τη Δαμασκό», θυμάται ο Αδάμ, ο οποίος βρίσκεται στη Λευκωσία τους τελευταίους τέσσερις μήνες.

Γεννήθηκε σε μια οικογένεια αρχιτεκτόνων και μηχανολόγων. Πριν από το 2012, η οικογένεια του Αδάμ ευημέρευσε από την αναπτύξη των χωριών γύρω από τη Δαμασκό. «Ο πόλεμος ξεκίνησε στα χωριά στα οποία εργαζόμασταν», αποκαλύπτει ο Αδάμ. «Η επιχείρησή μας ανατινάχθηκε, όλα τα κτίρια που κατασκευάσαμε στα χωριά ανατινάχθηκαν, όλα ανατινάχθηκαν».

Ως αποτέλεσμα, ο πατέρας του Αδάμ δεν έχει εργάστει τα τελευταία έξι χρόνια. «Περιμένει απλώς να τελειώσει ο πόλεμος», λέει ο Αδάμ, ενώ η μητέρα του πηγαινοέρχεται μεταξύ Βηρυτού και Δαμασκού για ιατρικούς λόγους αλλά και για να ξεφύγει από την ατμόσφαιρα που ο πόλεμος έχει επιβάλει στην καθημερινότητά της.

«Όταν μιλάω με τη μητέρα μου και τη ρωτώ τι κάνει ο πατέρας μου, μου λέει ότι φτιάχνει αστικά σχέδια για τη Δαμασκό, για μετά τον πόλεμο. Κάθεται στο γραφείο του και τα επεξεργάζεται όλα. Που θα κτιστεί το νοσοκομείο, σε ποιο οικόπεδο, ποια κτίρια θα λειτουργήσουν για τους αστέγους… Δεν είναι καλό για έναν άντρα να μην έχει τίποτα να κάνει».

«Αν τελειώσει ο πόλεμος, σίγουρα θα επιστρέψω στη Συρία. Οπουδήποτε κι αν βρίσκομαι στον κόσμο, θα επιστρέψω. Θα ήθελα να ανοικοδομήσω τη Δαμασκό», προσθέτει.

Με έναν αδερφό να ζει στη Βηρυτό και τον άλλο στη Γερμανία, ο Αδάμ επιζητεί προστασία στην Κύπρο τους τελευταίους τέσσερις μήνες και αναμένει ότι σύντομα θα ληφθεί απόφαση από τις υπηρεσίες ασύλου.

«Είμαι πολύ καινουργιος εδώ. Πρέπει να δω αν θα έχω την ευκαιρία να συνεχίσω τη ζωή μου εδώ, αλλά τώρα περιμένω, περιμένω, περιμένω. Είμαι πολύ ανησυχος. Είμαι 25 ετών και προσπαθώ. Δεν είμαι ατόμο που τα παρατά, αλλά είναι πραγματικά δύσκολο», παραδέχεται.

«Ο πόλεμος μου έχει διδάξει πώς να αγαπώ τον λαό μου, πώς να τον καταλαβαίνω. Πριν, όταν έβλεπα Σύριους στη Δαμασκό, δεν τους χαιρετούσα και δεν έδινα σημασία. Τώρα όμως όταν τους βλέπω εδώ, τους μιλάω, προσπαθώ να πάρω τιε έγνοιες τους επάνω μου και να αντιμετωπίσω τα προβλήματα που αντιμετωπίζουν αυτοί. Αυτό έμαθα. Έμαθα να σκέφτομαι για τους άλλους».

Ένας από τους λόγους για τους οποίους επέλεξε να έρθει στην Κύπρο είναι γιατί εδώ αισθάνεται ότι είναι πιο κοντά στους γονείς του.

«Κανείς δεν φαντάστηκε ότι θα εκτοπισθούμε εδώ. Όλοι οι Σύριοι δυσκολεύονται να το δεχτούν, αν και κάποιοι αποδέχονται την ιδέα να φύγουν μακριά. Πριν (τον πόλεμο) κανείς τους δεν φανταζόταν ότι θα ταξίδευαν έξω από τη Συρία. Αγαπάμε τη χώρα μας, θέλουμε να παραμείνουμε σε αυτήν», δηλώνει.

«Η Δαμασκός είναι όμορφη, αλλά όλοι έχουν φύγει, όλοι οι νεαροί εχουν φύγει. Η Δαμασκός είναι γεμάτη γυναίκες και ηλικιωμένους. Όλοι οι νέοι είναι ταραγμένοι. Αυτός ο πόλεμος μας στοίχισε 30 χρόνια, μια γενιά… Αν τελειώσει ο πόλεμος τώρα, θα χρειαστούμε τα επόμενα 30 χρόνια για να ανοικοδομήσουμε όχι μόνο τη Δαμασκό, αλλά και τον ίδιο το λαό και αυτό είναι πραγματικά κάτι δύσκολο να σκεφτούμε. Και λύση να βρούμε, θα έχουμε να αντιμετωπίσουμε άλλα προβλήματα».

Κατά τη διάρκεια της συνομιλίας μας, ο Αδάμ μοιράζεται από το κινητό του φωτογραφίες της ζωής του στη Συρία -την όμορφη μαμά του, τους αδελφούς του, το σπίτι του, το σκύλο του που άφησε πίσω του. Μου δείχνει μια φωτογραφία του σπιτιού που είχε η οικογένειά του στα προάστια της Δαμασκού. «Υπάρχουν άνθρωποι που ζουν στο καλοκαιρινό μας σπίτι. Έσπασαν την πόρτα, μπήκαν μέσα και ζουν τώρα σε αυτό. Αλλά είναι άνθρωποι, δεν μπορούμε να τους πούμε να φύγουν, χρειάζονται καταφύγιο σε αυτόν τον πόλεμο», μου λέει καθώς συνεχίζει να περιεργάζεται τη φωτογραφική συλλογή του στο τηλέφωνό του.

Ωστόσο, μέσα από τη δική του προοπτική -κάποιου που ζει μακριά από τη χώρα του που έχει διχαστεί από τον πόλεμο- ο Αδάμ σκέφτεται τι του έχει διδάξει ο πόλεμος.

«Ο πόλεμος μου έχει διδάξει πώς να αγαπώ τον λαό μου, πώς να τον καταλαβαίνω. Πριν, όταν έβλεπα Σύριους στη Δαμασκό, δεν τους χαιρετούσα και δεν έδινα σημασία. Τώρα όμως όταν τους βλέπω εδώ, τους μιλάω, προσπαθώ να πάρω τιε έγνοιες τους επάνω μου και να αντιμετωπίσω τα προβλήματα που αντιμετωπίζουν αυτοί. Αυτό έμαθα. Έμαθα να σκέφτομαι για τους άλλους».

Καθώς η κουβέντα μας τελειώνει, ο Αδάμ με βοηθά να καταλάβω ότι ο λόγος που βρίσκεται εδώ είναι για να βρει ελπίδα, να βρει προστασία. Ωστόσο, μέρος του ανησυχεί για το μέλλον του, ακόμη και αν του χορηγηθεί άσυλο.

«Σπούδασα αρχιτεκτονική για έξι χρόνια και είμαι καλός στην αρχιτεκτονική, είμαι καλός στoν αστικό προγραμματισμό, είμαι καλός στο να φτιάχνω σχέδια. Θα μου είναι δύσκολο να κάνω μια άλλη δουλειά, όπως να καθαρίζω αυτοκίνητα».

«Δεν μου αρέσει να περνώ το χρόνο μου άσκοπα. Αυτό είναι μεγάλο πρόβλημα. Μάθαινω γαλλικά για να μπορώ να καταλάβω τους Αφρικανούς με τους οποίους ζω. Μαθαίνω ένα νέο αρχιτεκτονικό πρόγραμμα, αλλά δεν είναι αρκετό. Περιμένω ήδη τέσσερις μήνες… Πρέπει να είμαστε υπομονετικοί και θα δούμε, δεν ξέρω τι έχει ο Θεός κατά νου για μας», λέει ο Αδάμ με το γενναιόδωρο έντονο χαμόγελό του να δείχνει ένα απροσδόκητο μελλον.

 

*** Η Κάριτας Κύπρου βοήθησε τον Αδάμ για εξασφάλιση στέγης και την αίτηση ασύλου κατά την άφιξη του στο νησί. Επίσης, στηρίζει τον Αδάμ με νομικές συμβουλές και κοινωνική υποστήριξη καθώς περιμένει απάντηση από την υπηρεσία ασύλου.

*** Τα ονόματα των ατόμων που συμμετείχαν σε συνεντεύξεις σε αυτά τα διηγήματα έχουν αλλάξει για να προστατεύσουμε την ιδιωτικότητα των ατόμων.

*** Για περισσότερες πληροφορίες ή ερωτήσεις, καλέστε στο 22662606 ή στείλτε email στο administration@caritascyprus.org

Share on Facebook33Share on Google+0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn0Pin on Pinterest0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *